René Cassin submits evidence to Hate Crime Inquiry

Posted on Thursday, September 1st, 2016

René Cassin recently submitted evidence to the Home Affairs Select Committee Inquiry into Hate Crime.

Hate crime is defined as any criminal offence which is perceived, by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice based on a personal characteristic. Hate crime can be motivated by disability, gender identity, race, religion or faith and sexual orientation. The days immediately following the EU referendum saw a rise in the number of attacks on people from ethnic minorities and of non-British nationality, including on their community centres and places of worship.

The Government announced on 30 June 2016 that the Home Office would be publishing a new action plan on hate crime.

Hate Crime Pic

René Cassin’s director Mia Hasenson-Gross commented that:

‘René Cassin recently submitted evidence to the Home Affairs Select Committee’s inquiry into Hate Crime and its violent consequences. We are happy to see concerted efforts happening at both national and local levels to tackle this problem. However, the recent rise of hate crime is troubling.

The increase in anti-Semitic incidents affect us as a Jewish community. Yet the spike in hate crime affects the country as a whole and in particular already marginalised communities. Hate crimes chip away at an individual and community’s sense of security. Unfortunately, our community has long dealt with this issue, but with that experience comes knowledge of how to tackle, confront and report hate crime. Knowledge that we should share with other communities facing similar problems.

There has long been a discrepancy between the amount of hate crimes committed and the amount of hate crimes reported. In particular, hate crimes directed towards Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities often do not show up on surveys due to low levels of reporting. We will be working on this issue in the lead up to and during Hate Crime awareness week (October 8th -15th) with several partners from the Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities.

There is no place for hate.’

 

You can read René Cassin’s full submission here.